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the synergy that is gained of all the services in order for us, nor to meet our nation's needs and the synergy and balance necessary to move forward and it limits the new strategy. one of the issues i have come when people do an evaluation of the army, look at brigade combat team, how many brigade combat team compounded when you for the future. that's important to that's fundamental to what we do. however, people tend to forget many other parts about the army that is so critical to us supporting the joint force. first, 75% of the operational forces special operations forces is army. can't forget about that. we are responsive camera to make sure we stay responsive to civil authorities and for the example we continue to make sure we have the right capability to respond to wildfires, hurricane relief, and as you see what's going on today up in the northeast. we provide a broad range of essential services today to combat and commanders that includes intelligence, surveillance, reconnaissance for all the geographic combatant commanders. we provide air and missile defense to all geographical combata
off the magnet. .. who are using undocumented workers. that will cut down the flow by about 90% of the border. that makes it possible to secure the border for those that are trying to come across for nefarious purposes for criminals enterprises. we can stop them at the border. then we say to those that are here in an undocumented status you are on probation paying a fine and this is to me what i find when i talk to people the most emotional issue in all of this is language. i find americans across the generations don't want us to have to sing the national anthem in two languages at the world series. they won the national anthem in english even if they were american. so they have to agree if they want to stay here permanently they have to agree to read, write and speak english. i find that among the undocumented workers they have no problem with this. they want to learn english. they understand that to live the american dream they have to learn to speak english. it's only liberals who inhabit college campuses and education departments who have a problem with english becoming the
effectively? he's so passionate about real data and real legal principles and be found as judge walker told us and chat and i refer to that decision, that if we have real data, we will always counter our foes who are trying to throw bias at the sabrett is passionate about that and that is loud be institute to be so successful in what it's done. he has the talent for tracking leading scholars from all over the country in an incredibly successful way so that over the years we have watched brad with his organizational chart and he filled in all the slots and we arrived at where we are today. so i thank you very much for the contribution he has made for us and i will turn it over to him to introduce the panel. >> thanks so much, tom. [applause] i want to start out by thanking tom. we were here at the very beginning like he said in this very room and his step with us along the way and that's really important to work here and around the country. i also want to thank matt and -- for putting together this great panel and doing all the work that gets all of us here in his room for this great commerce s
excellent idea. unfortunately, only one-third of that is going to be used. so $200 million is going to go unspent that can go out and serve unserved america today. the same issue will be in front of us in 2013. that's what windstream's waiver is all about, is there other ways to think about this other than setting the 775 limit. and beyond that i think getting on to the model that we need going forward for universal service funding. the industry, the usta has put forth a model, but the fcc has to come up with their own model which will drive caf ii is what we're calling it, the connect america fund 2, so that's where the biggest bang for the buck will be in our business. because remember, as we looked at these more than minor changes in the financials of the telephone companies across the country, it was so important that we do these two things coincidentally. we kind of got a little bit out of sync. we've gotten one done very effectively, efficiently and fast. it's happen realtime, it's showing up in the numbers today, we've just got to work this usf thing out x it's about the cons
unspent that can go out and serve unserved america today. the same issue will be in front of us in 2013. that's what windstream's waiver is all about. is there other ways to think about this other than setting this $775 limit? beyond that, i think getting on to the model that we need going forward for universal service funding. the industry, put forth a model, but the fcc needs their own model which will drive calf too, that's where the energy needs to be put. that's where the biggest bang for the buck will be in the business because, remember, as we looked at these more than minor changes in the financials of the telephone companies across the country, it was so important that we do these two things coi understand didn'tly. -- coincidentally. we got out of sync, one down efficiently and fast. we just have to work the usf thing, and it's about the consumer. >> host: jeff gardner, president and ceo of the windstream corporation. he is also chairman this year of the u.s. telecom trade association. he's been our guest on "the communicators" along with paul barbagallo of bloomberg.
to be a bigger and more difficult issue and it deserves more than 10 seconds, but particularly the attacks on u.s. corporations and intellectual property is the core problem. on some national dialogue i think it's a very interesting interesting subject and a great question. i think there's a lot that could be done in the investment area and relating to that in the ipr area. it's been more successful at the subnational level than the national level. governors and china want to invest more than their national governments want to encourage it. and, perhaps you can use leverage to improve icr performance at the regional level in china which is where the real problem lies oic real possibilities here. >> please join me in thanking this terrific panel. [applause] >> could i just note it as was mentioned before we have a really exceptional book event opportunity nine days from that day in the afternoon on wednesday, november 28. we will be putting out an announcement. thank you. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversation
fulfilling the commitment to us. of course, our thoughts and prayers are with you, governor, and your family. he is a governor dedicated to his people, to the rule of law, and to the future of the united states of america, and we're very pleased and honored to have him here with us today, governor rick scott. [applause] >> good morning. thank you for the introduction. the -- it's great to be here, i want to introduce you to a couple people. this is my wife, ann, married since we were 19 years old. we've been very fortunate. [applause] she makes sure if i say anything, she corrects it, he didn't really say that. she does communications. [applause] [laughter] and then my general council, and he's done a great job. [applause] so ten days after a long and con contentious presidential election, it seems our whole political system has become a constant campaign. one election barely seems to end before in the middle of another one. there is virtually no breaking in between. that leaves us tiredded and a little aggravated. a break is especially important in between elections because elections are ab
in the southwest, been in the u.s. since the was basically took half of mexico. and the new latino population which is foreign-born, 40% foreign-born, and the rest of the children of immigrants. very conservative. i know when asked about government they may give answers that are not extraordinary, but sometimes we get tangled, caught up with polls. resort have seen in this election cycle. and i think with latinos we cite polling with specific issues but is that a better understanding of where they're coming from you will get an understanding of why they're answering the questions that way. but i believe with the latino community, we lost the latino vote because of immigration. if we would have a better position on immigration, from the get-go, from the primary governor romney would've been competitive and it would've been competitive in those battleground states where the latino vote was decisive. and, finally, we have to stop being rockefeller republicans. we are not the party of the 47%. you know, when governor romney said what he did last week that obama won because it gives to latinos and other
these people and the results of this investigation, fulfilling compasses obligation to provide oversight of us we had many opportunities to improve and provide better protection in these opportunities run the gamut from following behavior of those who are in charge entities like mf global, to monitoring and modifying the ways in which the ratings agencies do their business, to their job. and there have been so many failures in so many ways, not only in mf global, but in other, similar stories in recent history. one common strand seems to be that we need to provide our regulators with better tools to pursue the enforcement of laws that existed prior to the massive imposition of dog crank. we do not have infinite resources and our financial marketplace. we do not have infinite resources to pursue every aspect of what regulators might want to pursue in dodd-frank, but they need to be able to dedicate resources to better following the nature of transactions in this rapidly evolving marketplace into understanding how they can curb the excesses of human nature in the case of mr. corzine by a more ef
february, which is pertinent because he made an important point. he said, maybe you can even use the word. the arab spring will come to china? i think we should be quite self-confident, not overconfident, but i think we have a sustainable model and then much less certain that china has at this point a truly sustainable model. so that's not really my worry from a european point of view. my worry is a different worry. i worry as we look at these global challenges that paula mentioned from terrorism to piracy to proliferation, it better, et cetera, our ability to create and maintain a functioning system of global government -- governance appears to have declined. our ability to have a working system of global governance. when i look at what's going on this area, to u.n. security council is dysfunctional, not working, not capable of coming to a conclusion. the g20 has not fulfilled, at least not according to me, the expectations we had when this larger body was created. in other words, from a european point of view, you need to worry about the fact that europe will have obviously a smaller po
about doing this with yemen, too which is of course in an area of the u.s. and saudi arabia to cooperate a lot on counterterrorism, on the gcc initiative to get the power not only the thing is how do you get this desperately poor country running out of everything all but once given the chance to get back on its feet. we are still working together on that. the big issues you to brief the next secretary on our iran sanctions and syria. the imposition of the current set of sanctions wouldn't have been possible without such a deal last november but if the sanctions led to iran losing up to or a little more than half of its oil exports, with saudi arabia be willing to step in and make those exports and i think with a caveat that we probably can't make up all of iran's exports whether it be a mechanism to totally shut them down because that would take the saudi production right up and leave no spare capacity which tends to be a driver for the higher oil prices. so, as the sanctions have come about, we had some bumps in the oil market particularly in the spring in anticipation, but as they've b
address these kind of concerns which would be useful in the long term but detrimental in the short term and they would pay a heavy political price for the increase in crime on the basic security that would come with this reform. if you talk a little bit about that and also in tunisia i was there a couple of weeks ago, and one of the topics that came up quite a bit was the attacks on the u.s. embassy and while those of us here that might obviously highlight the need for the securities sector reform i feel like a lot of tunisian actors interpret things very different and to some the less says that we need stronger security forces and that some of the changes, some of the modest changes we might see as positive and the very modest direction of the reform over the past year are seen by some as a cause for the week security forces and the call for incidents like the attacks on the embassies. if you can comment on this tension and how to address that. >> the iron fist notes the outrage. you want to jump in on this? >> sure. i mean, first of all i would sort of like to the secure a sector refo
in the hands of our grandchildren? or am i going to step up and lead? i used to get criticized because i was a deal maker. i talked to people like joe lieberman, we would find a way to get things done. you have to give a little to get a little. doesn't wind up getting you in trouble? oh, yes. but after all, that is what this is all about. the president has said himself, and i quoted him in an article that may run in the "washington post" tomorrow, he says america deserves better. it begins with him. mcconnell has to be engaged. harry reid has to be engaged. we are at a profit this year. maybe it is the fiscal cliff. but we have to act on a lot of really serious things and we had some of it now. we have to do a lot of it next year. if they do the right thing, that our country will benefit the legacy will be secure. so i want to open this up. a lot of people in this room are engaged in this effort, frankly in a more activist way and ceos have been engaged in anything like this in a long time. i would like to hear from some of them. before i do that, i would like to ask you a question about
people were very strategic in their use of their resources. and they had a lot. obama raised about a billion dollars. they were very strategic. obama's campaign can buy a television advertisement at the lowest rate possible, whereas the television stations, local television stations that are selling that want to make as much money as possible and they don't have to offer low rate to the super pacs. they can charge the super pac as much as the market will bear and in fact because of the saturation, and they in fact did say that many were paying 10 or 15 times more for 30 seconds in the obama campaign was. so i don't want to say that -- it would be satisfying to say money didn't have any effect, so despite the billions that report and the people trying to manipulate elections or even worse, another aspect of the citizens united campaign was an employer received both the sample ballot to his workers paychecks. so they would get an idea of how you wanted them to vote. there were a lot of employers who did that. but romney encouraged employers to do that. in terms of citizens united, fi
part of the historic results of this last week where he had 20 women in the u.s. senate, and historic number and rebecca rightly reminded us that it was in part because of things like emily's list that i want to have a conversation about the kind of institutions and the organizations that have been working quiet they all this time to make this moment possible. i don't have to say something about emily's list. >> families list within washington politics, it is an incredibly powerful force. at some point they were the largest organization. i don't know if that's still true, in the day of the super pacs, they are not the largest anybody. so emily's list is an organization that supports democratic pro-choice women for all kinds of offices around the country. they are very powerful and have been working really hard for a long time to get more women effect did. other celebration about the creator of the woman, sometimes you want to say this is terrific progress in other times you say wow, 20%. but it's very, very work getting women elected. so i cited emily's list because they're the bigge
that companies-x% parental consent for the use of tracking, you know, of children, on behavior. which is actually difficult to implement. and a lot of industry has been very vocal about, concerns about this. i just wanted to check where that stands. is that also going to be done by the end of the year? >> that is something fortunately we have some control over. it is an update the childrens online privacy protection act. it is rule making and we're looking at all the comments that came in and sort of weighing, weighing how to tweak the regulation and we'll finish it up by the end of the year i'm pretty sure. julia, i don't think it is as controversial as you suggested. >> everything is controversial in my view. that is what is so interesting. one of the most compelling criticisms i heard of cop pa -- copa. it disincentivizes children's cone tent because he have to get consent. as a parent i don't feel there are november places where i can feel safe for my children going online. what do you have to say for that argument? >> look, i would say, we're talking first of all, we're talking about very vu
that the employer can use. now, i grant this isn't just a skills training program, but you've got to know how to write, to speak, to think. and i think a lot of our problem is that we graduate many students that don't necessarily do that well. and if the humanity majors, and they do not do that especially well, then they have got trouble. so, and they can't necessarily prove they do those things will. earlier someone said, i think you, jim, talked about the need for computer skills. my guess is that if the humanities majors, major really helped some sort of certification, that showed certain skills. i think that we haven't fully grappled with how to deal with our desire, our feeling that we need to have the humanities as a critical part of the university, we need to have the numbers, students take these. we believe that but we haven't grappled with how we can get these folks jobs. they are not going to get at the big corporations and less they have very good grades. and we can't necessarily, so far, it's not easy for them to establish they have the skills, especially if they don't have those
. you have been quoted as saying that there are very likely as many or more spies working against u.s. interests inside the u.s. during the cold war, which was a head snapping quote when i read it. who are these people and what are they after? >> i don't know that. i've been on the government for six years, but if you look at the value of intelligence, importance of intelligence in the expenditures of resources by china, by russia, but others and look for them is one of the biggest is. well it's the u.s. not only national security secrets, the commercial seats as be of much of can be gleaned or stolen from cyberspace. it is a dire threat in part because we shifted so much attention, so much resource and the counterterrorism arena we've forgotten the necessity of old-fashioned counterintelligence and that's an important element of this. >> often i've heard some people involved in counterintelligence tends to be seen as the redheaded stepchild of the intelligence world. why is that when we need it and what is the cure for a? effect in part because it's something we don't want to think a
of office of u.s. citizenship appointed by president bush. he was responsible for developing and promoting initiatives and programs to educate immigrants about the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. and encourage their integration into american civic culture. brad bailey is the co-founder and ceo of texas immigration solution. from 2000 to 2011, brad was vice president of operations for three bailey family-owned houston-area restaurants. brad co-founded texas immigration solutions in 2012. the group seeks to develop and advance conservative solutions to u.s. immigration policy. brad also served on the 2012 platform committee of the republican party of texas. richard land is president of the ethics and religious liberty commission, that's the southern baptist convention's official entity assigned to address social, moral and call concerns with particular attention to their impact on american families and their faith. richard is also executive editor of ffv, a national magazine dedicated to coverage of traditional religious values, christian ethics and cultural trends. and last but
that he's doing now so when some of us suggested the misreading of the mandate he did it for years ago. he threw away the approval rating to spend the stimulus package written on all this other stuff, massive debt and spending and you had a million people go to the streets around august, april 15th. he had only just showed up and started spending crazily. tarp ii me and you then have a reaction from the movement that reacted in 2010. people lost the elections over spending too much. okay. the first by half to get whacked was arlen specter of pennsylvania. i was working with him to get in the elected and on the labour union demand not wanting to have elections to have power. he was going to fend off the right of center primary and be able to govern and get reelected and then obama said if you vote for the stimulus instead of philadelphia and we can probably do some things to be helpful in pennsylvania and he said i just want a free election. when the primary. i'm going to sign on the stimulus. obama is going to stay out of get out the vote against me and people will be happy i brought someb
leaders and don't forget the leaders haven't helped us at all. in any effect really coming and in any effective way they are there and listen to us and they tell their position that they really haven't been out there. but what is disturbing to me is maybe the democrats could gain if we do go off the cliff and then republicans maybe we could gain and go over the cliff i think that is disastrous to even think in those terms and like erskin said, but in your country. i am not quite won over by it all come and a couple years ago you were the ones that said we are going to go over the cliff and i said no i think they will go over the cliff. erskin holds out for another 30% chance. >> i just think we can't be stupid enough to do it. we can resolve this problem now and by making some very tough but doable compromises. if we go over this question and we don't make a deal immediately thereafter here's what will happen and i think that is about a one-third probability that we are going to go over the cliff and nothing is going to happen. what will happen is that you will see movies and fitch do
that americans are used to experiencing. and it was a terrible tragedy and the crime. but there were a lot of ideas as to how to cast foreign policy in response to 9/11, such as invading iraq and people were actually advocating this well before we had the 9/11 terrorist attacks. making regime change in iraq the official policy of federal government actually occurred during the clinton administration when the iraq liberation act was passed in 1998 and signed into law by president clinton and supported by many republicans in congress. it had bipartisan support. vice president gore was a supporter, that is why i am not completely convinced that that is a counterfactual point. we have a lot of interest and people were casting around, trying to find solutions. and i do think the initialization of afghanistan was correct, whether that means we need to be there for 10 years or until afghanistan becomes connecticut, that is another matter entirely. but i think the initial strikes against those were necessary and just. but then to go out and pursue regime change, prior to 9/11, they simply casted i
on a takedown of the treasury in the auto bailout. three guys earned $4.2 billion from the u.s. treasury. you remember that from the debate, right? no one asks, no one is answering that begin today, we got the confirmation from the romney campaign. now, what is this all about? and what does it have to do with the congo? i was reporting for bbc television and the guardian. when i found out that someone had figured out how to dip their hands, their claws into the foreign aid fund, the debt relief given to the republic of congo which is suffering a cholera epidemic. this money was intended to be used, $90 million intended to be used to in the cholera epidemic in the congo and yet it was waylaid by a bird of prey, a vulture, a vulture fund, a guide -- managed by a guy named paul singer. is other middle name is elliott. paul elliott singer who has accompanied by a good name of elliott management so i went up the congo river for abc television to find out what happened and i found elliott management had their claws around the cholera of money for the congo. we reported it on bbc television and the
who mentioned this to me as us going out the door last night, we had three major house special elections over the last couple of years. one in pennsylvania, mark critz one that when. one in new york when chris lee, he is sending videos or photographs of his shortlist top left office in upstate new york, was replaced by the democrat kathy hogle. and the third, when arizona seat open up after congressman giffords stepped down after the horrible shooting. she was replaced by congressman barber. the democrats won all three of those special elections, and each and every case they said they won because of medicare. did somebody say medicare? at what was, medicare. and then what the democrats had was, and we're going to use that as a template for winning in the twinkling election. didn't work at the congressional -- 2012 election. women look at the exit polls and we see why people voted and how they voted, sometimes it's not so civil. the exit polls have some very strange results. i'll get into a couple of these. is the country had in the right direction or sears off on the wrong trac
that is not a foreign policy. you know, it sounds like he's talking about the u.s. being out front first, and the you know, the rest being alone. i think this administration came in and found a number of our alliances and partnerships afraid in the post-iraq period because of, you know, the previous years and the previous administration. and i think this president has sought to adopt an approach to american leadership that really inspires and enabled others to step up and contribute alongside us. on the theory that that collective action on the part of the international community is much more effective in dealing with the kind of threats and challenges that we face today. you can see it in the 49 nation coalition that's been built in afghanistan. you can see it with regard to how we've gone after al qaeda globally with partners on the ground. we can see it in the most crippling sanctions regime ever put in place with regard to iran, where countries like china and russia, along with our traditional allies and a number of other states across the world have stepped up to impose the sanctions together. a
to block them out. it has already been used, as my co-panelist mentioned, as a prelude, the shock troops before the russians invaded estonia and georgia. this is a bipartisan issue. you have senator lieberman saying its cyberwar and the cyberthreat is a clear and present danger. the same with senator collins. senator barbara, you can go down the list. they will all tell you they, too, are scared about the threat. mike mcconnell before his director of national intelligence warned that if instead of laying aircraft into buildings in new york -- flying aircraft into buildings in new york, the terrorists had directed a cyber attack at the largest banks in new york, the economic impact would have been 10 times worse than 9/11 actually was. this is not a theoretical threat. those of you who have had trouble accessing your banks, senator lieberman has pointed to the iranians as retaliating against the u.s. banks for the stuxnet attack that i will talk about momentarily. and our power grid. what is the risk? well, one is that terrorists want to break into our power grid. those of you that have l
candidates for u.s. senate. rick berg and heidi heitkamp. i'm stacy sturm with the league of women voters, and i will be your moderator this evening. joining me on the panel is the special sections editor for the bismarck tribune and lawrence king, an attorney and also a member of the bismarck school board. this evening's debate takes place at horizon middle school in bismarck and has been organized by the league of women voters. it's co-sponsored by dakota media access and the bismarck tribune. the league of women voters is a nonpartisan organization and promotes the informed participation of all citizens in their government. this is intended to be a respectful exchange of ideas. our purpose this evening is to provide voters with information about the candidates and their positions on the issues that affect the people of north dakota. the audience here tonight is asked to, please, reserve applause or any reaction or comments until the forum has ended. tonight's debate forum will be as follows: each candidate will have 90 seconds to respond to each question. following responses to the que
out an electoral victory. we'd like to welcome everybody who's joining us now on c-span2. if you're on c-span 1, you have to switch over. if you had a friend that didn't switch over, run over there, pound on that door. you can join us at politico.com, there's an e-mail that will come directly to us onset. we're going to bring you into the conversation. it's 10:00, the polls have closed in most of the states that will determine the outcome of this election. i would say if you wanted to step back and where do we stand at 10:00 on election night, the big headline, the one headline we know for sure, joe donnelly won the senate seat for democrats in indiana, a huge and what unexpected victory for democrats, makes it almost impossible for republicans to win back the senate. we have declared long ago that the house will stay in republican hands, it now looks like the senate will stay in democratic hands. so it's all down to the presidential race about whether or not we have a status quo, divided government in washington. the early states that have been called are very much looking in ba
cain's campaign and a lawyer at kaplan and drysdale. [audio difficulty] >> -- way for us, which is -- [applause] [audio difficulty] >> the colbert superpac. [laughter] so he's been on colbert many, many times, and this little segment is colbert handing off his pac to john mccain, all of which -- according to trevor -- to jon stewart, is perfectly legal. all right. cue the tape. >> can i run for president and keep my superpac? don't sugar coat it. >> no. >> okay. that's a little less sugar than i was hoping for. [laughter] >> you could have it run by somebody else. >> wait, what? what? someone else can take it over? >> yes. but someone who you would not be coordinating with in terms of pac ads and strategy. >> oh, trevor, i wouldn't want to even create the appearance of electoral skull dug erie, if that's a word i can say on a family show. [laughter] but i think, i think there may be a guy. jon? jon stewart, everybody! trevor, if you will, colbert superpac transfer activate. [laughter] [cheers and applause] >> colbert, colbert, colbert superpac is dead. [laughter] >> but it has been reborn. [lau
, but i think we have to look at the record. >> did someone tell you to filibuster us? >> i apologize but it's an important issue and i care about a. >> you did not have the authority to stop this. that is what you keep saying today that you don't have the authority to do it. do you think dr. smith's agency should have stopped its? if you don't doubt, just say you don't know. >> i think that clearly massachusetts is working very hard. >> do you think they could have stopped at? >> they were unsuccessful and you know it was tragic. we worked hard with them to limit -- >> okay, okay. i have two more questions for you then. is your position today that the necc was not a manufacturing pharmacy and that you had no jurisdiction over its business activities quit is that your position today? yes or no? >> necc is registered as a compounding pharmacy. >> in your opinion, your opinion, this is at the request of the hearing now, is it your position as necc was not a manufacturing pharmacy and you had no jurisdiction over its activities? yes or no? >> that is in subject of an ongoing investigatio
after all here today have. forgotten. fate looked down kindly on us when she chose neil to be the first to venture to another world. to have the opportunity to look back from space at the beauty of our own. it could have been another.ow it wasn't. it wasn't for a reason. no one, no one, but no one could have accepted the responsibility of his remarkable accomplishment with more dignity and more grace than neil armstrong. he embodied all that is good and all that is great about america. >>> more from the memorial service for neil armstrong thanksgiving day on c-span at 10 oom eastern and just before 11:30, a behind the scenes look at life as a teenager in the white house with susan ford baal and lyndon johnson rob, and after one, how scientists use game skills and theories to solve world problems. >>> a conversation with president obama's biographers after his re-election. hear from journalists ron suskind, author of "the confidence men: wall street, washington, and the education of a president." the atlantic, aspen institute, and the newseum hosted the forum. >> we have one titled "why
four days to the november elections, watch key u.s. senate races tomorrow from around the country. first, reairing this debate from maine with democrat dill, republican summers, and independent king. that's followed by montana senator john tester against republican congressman denny rehberg, and later, arizona congressman flake facing rich carmona. watch the election results tuesday nights and key contests in the house, senate, and governors' races on c-span. tonight here on c-span2, penn state president erikson speaking at the national press club followed by a u.s. house debate from new york, and, later, a debate on issues that matter to young voters in this year's presidential election. >>> next, penn state university president speaks about the future of his university, and he'll also answer questions about the on going child sex abuse investigation and the former charges against former university president. this is about an hour. >> it's a picture-perfect college town nestled amid the central hills of central pennsylvania. an enormously popular university boasts the largest alu
together, you know, are going to bankrupt us in the future. and, you know, medicare, it's all health care. if we don't solve that problem, we've got a problem whether it's the government spending or private spending. so we've got health care cost inflation as the number one problem. the aging is really not that big of a problem. with social security we saved money in the trust fund to get us past most of the peak boomer retirement years. life expectancy growth is so moderate as a factor compared to other things that once the baby boomers retire, costs as a share of g, the p -- gdp level off. there is a little growth in life expectancy, but it's very minor. if there's a demographic problem, it's the dropoff in births, not, you know, in population growth which has to do with immigration and the birthrate and not with life expectancy. and for the record, i'm in favor of gradually increasing the payroll tax to offset increases in life expectancy because it would be so slow and so modest that it wouldn't be much of a tax increase, and it would sort of shut people up altogether. but usually, of
there was a real wine. i was afraid there would be a backlash and all of us were feeling. they were putting forth the same effort they put forward for years. the prejudices and they never really re-examine what it would mean to reconsider those tropes in those slightly shifted things. and so when you had todd akin, we'll really have to think a lot about, is that religious religion, or is it really deep and historical sense of oneness? my own little theory is that it became until recently, people like strom thurmond, the fact that so many white men, historically in this country pulled themselves that they were not the product of race and so this invisibility of the product of race is not the product of the women who must've really wanted them. otherwise it is -- it is very clear that some parts operate at a distance. >> i would also, speaking to your question about whether this is about action or reaction, and of course, i think it is all part of this so that everything is constant in action and reaction -- one thing i want to point to, i think when we talk about these kind of race comments on the
for us compete, first we had forces in carriage, and we had cars, now we are in a global marketplace. i was just in california last week and we need to compete across the country that involves investment technology and it starts in grades k-12. to talk about jobs for people in their 20s and 30s, that is important. but we will not be competitive in the global marketplace we don't focus on it here at home. >> moderator: charlie summers? summers: our government has not been able to work together because of what everyone said. we are not putting in place specific things like comprehensive tax reform that makes sense. inefficiently accumulates revenue and is evenly distributed. what we need to do is make sure that we have comprehensive tax reform that makes sense and address the misallocation of resources that we see to our government, as for instance in benghazi, when they drew down thousands of marine from iraq. we can have more independence there to make sure that the parties know that there is someone else available to take their place. >> moderator: let's move onto the next question rig
much of the u.s. cable coverage that i was seeing about the drug war, especially in this part of the country, to me seemed woefully decontextualized. it felt like rubbernecking body count journalism. x number of people were shot on the state. this person was be headed there, but no context. no background, no history, the deepening of the story. i'm by no means a expert on mexico's drug war, but i did have a very strong interest in this region and in. i began researching as early as -- in itjuana. i began researching in 2007 while looking for another story. unlike other journalists, who do not have the amount of time that you often need to tell the stories, when i was in production i had a little over two years to spend with the story. that is enough time to deepen your sense of a place, an institution, to gain trust and to hopefully have a deeper narrative. whether or not i succeeded at -- or failed is up to the audience and the people who push back on my perspective, but for me the ability to spend time with an issue, too deep and your understanding of that issue, provide the
just describe it. by the way, i wish you had not reminded liberals that many of us don't think they've done so well in trying to destroy me because more than any book i've ever written, i have never had a book so ignored by the mainstream media. [laughter] i always make -- this is one thing i changed my mind about. i've maintained ferociously liberals can't learn that if you cut taxes, there's revenue to the treasury, can't learn it doesn't work to coddle and suck up to terrorists, but, apparently, they can learn if they attack ann coulter, she sells more books. [laughter] i love those gals on "the view," and i wanted to kiss them all before i left. [laughter] you know, i realize that people who are familiar with the actual history of civil rights in america or who have read my books notice that they had not read the books, but that was great because they believe everything the "new york times" believes, but the new york times won't argue with me. at least the gals on "the view" will argue with me. the summary of the book is white guilt never produced anything good, and don't make t
will continue to use. we will have a couple of days off and at thanksgiving and will have a couple of days off and maybe one or two off for the new year. but outside of that, the work continues in terms of american needs in this nation. >> host: do you foresee a hearing on sandy and its affect? >> guest: i anticipate -- i'm not sure if it would be necessarily at the federal level. but i know in terms of this -- i'm pretty confident that there will be some assessment. normally on a state-by-state level. again, looking at and evaluating and making pronouncements is what we can do better. there will be hearings. i'm not sure if it will escalate to the federal level. >> host: thank you, mignon cyburn and paul kirby. this is the tremont on c-span2. "communicators" on c-span2. .. >> on the aid of the 2012 election former u.s. representatives talked about competitive u.s. house and senate races around the country. panels includes former representative former chairs of the republican, democratic national committees. from the bipartisan policy center in washington, this is an hour and 20 minutes. [inau
will be moderating the panel. the novelist will be joining us later. ms. kaplan will also be speaking, the founder of the miami book fair, introducing and opening the weekend coverage. in just a minute we'll take you now to chapman all. it's rather full. we will be beginning or coverage varies and. we are live on book tv. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good morning. i had a little bit too much coffee is morning. it is a pleasure to see you. we are delighted to welcome you to the first session this saturday morning. how are you today. [applause] as you know, this is one of the most exciting times for us in the fall season in miami, and we are thrilled with this morning's panel. first and foremost, we would like to thank everyone who helped make this impossible, including our sponsors as well as blue florida and our volunteers. before we get started now would like to ask everyone to please turn of
. everybody is running to the thompson reuters counter. thank you for joining us. great to be with you. i am steve -- steve clemons, editor of large of the atlantic, i want to compliment the museum and tell you how historic this is. this is a jam packed day. the google party is coming up, this is one of three times in the history of the museum that they have allowed an outside group, the other happened to be the president of the united states and madeleine albright when she was secretary of state, this is the third time for a during the day session here, this is a great partnership. i think the -- i have a friend here, allen was the founder of circuit city, just apparently wrote the rise and fall of circuit city and to some degree they are uncomfortable truths, when you think of nations and companies, there are rise and fall stories and the united states is so clean not on the fall side but political campaigns are a lousy time to think about the truth of what is happening. one of the hard truths, there were five white guys, we tried to figure out, tall guys and doug and we are very well awar
'd like to hear from you. tweet us your feedback, twitter.com/booktv. >> now on booktv, from the 17th annual texas book festival many austin, texas, robert draper discusses his book titled "do not ask what good we do: inside the u.s. house of representatives." this is about 45 minutes. >> good afternoon. i'm evan smith, i'm the ceo andy editor-in-chief of the texas tribune. i am pleased to be here with myt old buddy, robert draper, av veteran magazine writer and author whose latest book is "doy not ask what good we do." robert is a familiar face around these parts having spent thei meaty, early part of his career as one of texas monthly'sil marquee writers, in fact, us being up here together again ise kind of like dean martin and jerry lewis back on stage.rkey [laughter] eing a bit together again is kind of like dean martin and jerry lewis back on stage. he is currently a contributing writer to the new york times magazine and national geographic and a correspondent for gq. his previous books include dead certain and critically acclaimed biography of george w. bush, a comprehensive his
for the longer-term trajectory of libya. that is a very useful thing to have on the table. thank you very much. thanks to the speakers who stuck so closely to time that we have almost a full hour for discussion which is really terrific and i will be taking questions. i want to ask our speakers briefly, a big question which is very briefly, you were fabulous in presenting us with diagnoses of issues. you talk a little about strategies. a bit more along those lines given the diagnosis that you each presented of the case in which you were working, just say briefly where you think the most promising opportunities might be for making progress dealing with the kinds of issues you and i like and because you did the overview will exempt you -- >> to go back to the theoretical discussions one basis to the steps in the concept, the first step is assessment and the second is strategic planning, it is appropriate we start here because we were taking and s s r classic s s r breach to these problems, and evaluation so that -- what is missing is this lack of assessments of strategic planning. when we were in
in this world than the u.s. military, to understand and think through all the secondary and tertiary, primary elements of a plan and how to execute it. so, leveraging that skill set and engaging with the appropriate authorities on how to respond to a health emergency, and how you would address these issues well before the incident occurs is probably the best solution. now, those teams probably exist to do that. but whether or not, it really depends on their maturity of that country and its ability to leverage very scarce resources. just like in the u.s., our health care professionals barely have enough time to address the day-to-day health care needs of the population, let alone planning for emergency. this is the challenge, but i think this is where the military and the u.s., in collaboration with its other federal partners, can be extraordinarily successful. >> in the back. i think we're probably just about running out of time, so the mic is behind you. core question. >> i'd like to refer back -- university of wisconsin republic referred back to ambassador hume's reference to the shipping i
in advance of a disaster? i think all of us agree with that. .. being that building relations with the people rising sow africa and the specifically aimed at building a capacity for administering hiv treatment in a country where the civilian authorities said they would never allow it. your point is well taken and sometimes there are opportunities to do that. >> of i can also. one of the most important ways to prevent is to do credible and reliable health surveillance. in many countries for which we have no strong visibility on the presence of infectious disease and with such a mobile world, undetected infectious diseases are a threat to us all. >> thank you. >> if you can see the hands better than i can, people with their hands up, position yourself and we will get the next time around. >> thank you for your presentation. as you know, there has been a debate about what health can contribute to security. there is agreement that health intervention and human security, and also the united states has a major role in humanitarian spots and that is not necessarily driven by national security consid
taxes now, that is not going to play in my judgment with any of us. we are not for raising revenue paid, certainly. second, remember we're at the 18 months ago we passed the debt ceiling increase, and now it's time to do the second debt ceiling increase? we're just a couple months away from having to go to that debate again, and we get to do any of the promise cuts from the 115 months ago. so where are those? this idea that race accident, we promise we'll get to the cuts, now we promise we'll get to the customer american people are saying are you serious? i think is really problematic. >> let's understand the big picture here, and the presence of philosophy. i've been watching, i remember him looking us in the eye the date was february 10, 2009 when he was selling his economic stimulus plan, and he said fdr's new deal actually did work but he should've spent a lot more money and then the records would've shown it. it seemed to me he was looking at writing of unexplained, he convinced me that he is a keynesian economist on steroids. when i look at this sequestration deal, and the fiscal
customers love it. it's a little bit lost on us why this is so wonderful because we listened to it all day long. it's the character. we're not a super slick kind of store and descriptive slurs represent that. it's a real old kind of story that she don't get a lot of communities anymore. were an independent bookstore since 1973 and i've owned the store since 2006 along with my house and. it is open by michael carson brca2 73 across the street and it's been part of the community ever since. visit the store after a flood in 1992 with the old sort have flooded it was time to expand and start in a fresh space, so we been here ever since. it's really a community bookstore. people have been coming here since the beginning. kids have grown up here and we definitely like being part of the community that way. i don't think you can fine-tune a chance of a thousand people that support through bookstores. i won time we had five bucks to respond within a stones to serve each other. you don't find that too many places anymore. most independent bookstores are closing around the country. some may support m
want to thank are candidates for joining us tonight. we appreciate very much. i want to thank all of you for joining us tonight. i'm mark w. johnson. have a great night. >> while you watch her election night coverage literature might go online to our election have. you'll find interactive maps with election results in the presidential race and the senate, house and governors contest. updates on the balance of power in congress, plus track the state balance initiatives all in real-time as the results coming. election have at c-span.org. >> i like the give-and-take. i like the balanced approach. and i also like to hear the collars. i don't call myself a like to hear the collars. some are unusual to say the least. c-span is everywhere. c-span in washington is just every defense, you know, small hearing, public policy meeting, downtown. c-span just seems to be there. >> steve austin watches on horizon. c-span, created by an american cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service on your television provider. >> next, a debate of issues important to younger voters in this p
. this is the same exact ad, just happens to use computer graphics or it uses the techniques of the time. >> as our troops defend america and the war on terror, they must have what it takes to win. john kerry has repeatedly opposed weapons vital to winning the war on terror. apache helicopters, f-16 fighter jets and hercules. components that are all built in florida. he even voted against body armor for troops our troops on the frontline of the war on terror. john kerry's record on national security is troubling. >> it is the same exact ad. the ads are more targeted these days. this is the florida version of that advertisement. all of the focus these days on swing states and targeting the swing states. it is the same identical message. this is something i'm not very proud of the, but what i found out recently was we did an event in 2008. mark mckinnon was one of the guest speakers and he created ads for the bush campaign in 2004. he said that he was actually a fan of this website and he knew about this website and he would look at it to try to get ideas and go back to a past campaign. so i will giv
injuring himself into a program at walter reed what it ended up using acupuncture, using meditation, using other techniques to wean him off of all the drugs that he was on, and through this program he actually was able to walk out of walter reed on his own two feet. so, you know, i really commend the military for two things, for one, for allowing us to tell this story, both good and bad, but for recognizing this problem by recognizing that there is this problem of overmedication and that they are looking for outside the box ideas and how to fix it. i mean, that's sort of the whole thesis of the film really, the metaphor of "escape fire" is the status quo isn't working and we need to start looking for outside the box ideas. >> more with matthew heineman, producer and director of "escape fire," the fight to rescue america's health care. sunday night at eight on c-span's q&a. >> live picture from the bipartisan policy center here in washington, d.c., a discussion just getting underway with political analysts and pollsters taking a look at the election numbers and examining a voter turnout and
on the immunity provisions, please send us bill language. did they? no. they did not. i think that is some testimony that's worth thinking about it. the majority leader offered to vote on a set list of amendments. he asked if the minority would put together the ten votes it wanted. as long as they were relevant and germane to the bill. and we'd go through them. no list was provided. and so we voted by a vote of 52-46 and cloture was not invoked. again, after the vote, the staff from both sides of the homeland security committee, the commerce committee, the intelligence committee held numerous meetings to negotiate a compromise. the effort did not succeed. so if we're to address the major problem of cyber attacks and potential cyber warfare, we have no option but to bring the lieberman-collins bill back on the floor. mr. president, i know my time is limited. i know the nation's cyber laws are woefully out of date. i want to also just touch on one thing. i received a call on the information sharing part of this bill about the homeland security portal or change. -- exchange. and that c.e.o. s
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